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The Science of Rhythm

 

Published Research on Drumming

Drumming reduces stress, tension, and anxiety. Blood samples from participants of an hour-long drumming session revealed a reversal of the hormonal stress response and an increase in natural killer cell activity. (Bittman, Berk, Felten, Westengard, Simonton, Pappas, Ninehouser, 2001, Alternative Therapies, vol. 7, no. 1).

Drumming provides for natural pain control. Drumming promoted the production of endorphins and endogenous opiates, the bodies own morphine-like painkillers, allowing for alleviation from pain and grief. (Winkelman, Michael, Shamanism: the Neural Ecology of Consciousness and Healing).

Drumming fights depression Stanford University School of Medicine conducted a study with 30 depressed people over 80 years of age and found that participants in a weekly music therapy group were less anxious, less distressed and had higher self-esteem (Friedman, Healing Power of the Drum, 1994).

Drumming stimulates the entire brain Drumming integrates the frontal and lower areas of the brain, allowing nonverbal information form the lower brain into the frontal cortex. “This produces feelings of insight, understanding, integration, certainty, conviction, and truth.” ((Winkelman, Michael, Shamanism: the Neural Ecology of Consciousness and Healing).

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Eye Witness Testimonials Last Updated on 2009-03-12 11:45:58 “Drumming together as a group really takes the clients out of the ‘now’ and allows them to be free from their stresses, problems, and addictions for that period of time. After, I definitely see a more relaxed temporary state in our clients.”   Tom Nicholas, M.S.W., The Journey at Willowcreek “The drumming brings our clients—who range in age from 19 to 70—together in unison. It also can bring out the lack of harmony allowing them to bring the rhythm back into unison. It is a nonverbal process that allows individuals to be in touch with themselves as well as begin to communicate with those around them through the rhythm…it serves as a diagnostic tool because you see how well an individual is functioning kinesthetically and whether they are having difficulty with neurological patterning.”  Patricia A. Toomey MS,ADTR,MS,LPC. Movement Psychotherapist and... More »
Benefits of Drumming Last Updated on 2009-03-11 19:08:19 ublished Research on Drumming Drumming reduces stress, tension, and anxiety. Blood samples from participants of an hour-long drumming session revealed a reversal of the hormonal stress response and an increase in natural killer cell activity. (Bittman, Berk, Felten, Westengard, Simonton, Pappas, Ninehouser, 2001, Alternative Therapies, vol. 7, no. 1). Drumming provides for natural pain control. Drumming promoted the production of endorphins and endogenous opiates, the bodies own morphine-like painkillers, allowing for alleviation from pain and grief. (Winkelman, Michael, Shamanism: the Neural Ecology of Consciousness and Healing). Drumming fights depression Stanford University School of Medicine conducted a study with 30 depressed people over 80 years of age and found that participants in a weekly music therapy group were less anxious, less distressed and had higher self-esteem... More »