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Chapter 0: Instructor's Guide to Integrating Concepts in Biology

Bio-Math Exploration 0.1: Is there a significant difference in learning environments?

The goal of this Bio-Math Exploration is to help you interpret data like the learning gains in Figure 1. You need to know the concept of a mathematical average. You will learn the concepts of standard deviation, standard error, p-value, and significant differences, all of which are used throughout ICB.

In Figure 1, class environment had a much greater effect on learning for some questions than for others.

Figure 1 Average change in test scores organized by type of question. Changes are the difference in individual performances between pretest and posttest. Purple bars are averages for the active-learning course, and teal bars are averages for the lecture course (+ 1 SE). * = p < 0.05; ** = p < 0.01; *** = p < 0.001; p > 0.05. Figure 1 from Udovic et al., 2002, by permission of Oxford University Press and AIBS.)

Student change in understanding is displayed graphically by the height of the bars. If a purple bar is much taller than the corresponding teal bar, then the active-learning course resulted in more learning gains, on average, than the traditional course. However, to conclude that there was a significantIn science, a significant change is one that is very unlikely to have occurred by chance, indicated by a small p-value. increase in average learning gains in one environment versus the other, you need to consider both the size of the sample, and the variation among different students. If the variability is high, or the sample size is small, then the difference in averages might be due to chance. Let’s walk through an example to illustrate this idea.

Suppose two small classes of 10 students each (Class A and Class B) are tested for learning gains on Question 1. Pre-test and post-test scores increase by the following amounts in Class A:

19, 17, 21, 16, 18, 20, 15, 19, 15, 20

and by the following amounts in Class B:

8, 26, 11, 33, –2, 15, 28, 14, 42, 5.

The students in a class are a samplea representative part or group from a larger whole or population from the population of students who might have taken that class in the past, or might take it in the future. Larger samples (more students) will more accurately represent the total population. The number of data points in a sample is the sample sizeThe sample size is the number of data points in a sample., and the average of the data points in a sample is called the sample averageThe sample average, also called the sample mean, is the average of the data points in a sample. or sample meanThe sample mean, also called the sample average, is the average of the data points in a sample..

Bio-Math Exploration Integrating Questions

  1. What does the negative number mean about the pre-test and post-test scores of student #5 in Class B?

  2. Calculate the average learning gains among the 10 students in Class A and in Class B.

  3. How would you describe the differences between these two samples?

 

 

These two hypothetical classes of 10 students have the same average learning gains of 18 points on Question 1, but the second class has much greater variability in their learning gains than the first class. One student in Class B even performed worse on the post-test (–2) than on the pre-test (a negative learning gain). Variability in a data set can be quantified by computing the standard deviationThe sample standard deviation is a measure of variability in a set of data points in a sample. (s) of each sample. The formula for the sample standard deviation, illustrated in CH00_SE.xlsx, is essentially the square root of the average of the squared differences between the data points and sample average. Another way to quantify variability in a sample is the standard errorThe standard error (SE) is a measure of variability in the sample average, equal to the sample standard deviation divided by the square root of n, where n is the sample size. (SE). SE is the standard deviation divided by the square root of the sample size. The standard error represents how much the average (not the individual data points) is expected to vary, and SE gets smaller with increasing sample size.

The error bar on each column in Figure 1 represents a distance of one standard error. For example, the average learning gain on Question 1 in Figure 1 in the active-learning environment was approximately 18, and the standard error was about 4.5. The standard error was approximately 0.68 in the Class A, and 4.36 in Class B. Error bars reflect how much variability there is in the sample, and provide much more information than the average alone. The data in Figure 1 are averages for 61 or 62 people, and a highly variable sample indicates that a different group of 61 or 62 people could have quite different outcomes.

Bio-Math Exploration Integrating Questions

  1. Use the data from Figure 1 to estimate the sample averages and standard errors for learning gains on Question 4 for both the lecture and active-learning environments.
  2. Based on the data presented in Figure 1, would it be possible for one student to have learned more in the traditional lecture environment than one in the active-learning environment? Would you expect this exception to the overall trend to be true for many students?
 

 

The p-valuep-value is the probability that outcomes as different as those displayed in the graph could be observed by chance rather than because of significant differences. displayed for each question in Figure 1 goes a step further than the error bars, addressing the uncertainty in the difference between learning gains in the two learning environments. Specifically, the p-value is the probability that average learning gains as different as those displayed in the graph could be observed if there were no difference in the learning environments. A small p-value, such as 0.05, means there is a low probability that there is no difference between learning environments. In other words, there is a high probability the two learning environments are truly different. A large p-value, such as 0.3, means there is a high probability that there is no difference between score changes in the two classes. In summary, a small p-value means there is a significant difference, and a large p-value means there is no significant difference.

Computing p-values requires a statistical method such as a chi-squared test (see BME 17.2) or a t-test (see BME 23.1). A rough rule of thumb is that if the standard error bars overlap, the difference is not significant, as seen in Figure 1 for Question 10. The important thing to remember is that a meaningful comparison of two populations always requires making several observations and comparing the averages of the observations in light of the variability within each sample. You should be very skeptical of a graph that does not include error bars or describe the variability in the results.

Glossary
Publishing Information
Citation: Paradise, C. (2014). Bio-Math Exploration 0.1: Is there a significant difference in learning environments?. Retrieved from http://www.trunity.net/ICB-demo/view/article/542988860cf27863bbf7c323